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Automotive Service


Published 1940


Opportunities for employment servicing America's vast motor fleet.


Run time 10:02
Producer Holmes (Burton) Films, Inc.
Sponsor Vocational Guidance Films, Inc.
Audio/Visual Sd, B&W


Shotlist

Contents. Impressions of the different jobs in automotive service and suggestions on training leading to entrance and to advancement in the trade.
Views of an ancient car, contrasted with scenes on busy streets and highways, illustrate the commentator's statement that with the growth of the automobile industry has come an increased demand for skilled automobile workmen. A mechanic replaces a camshaft, and grinds valves on an L-head and a valve-in-head engine as the commentator points out that in engine repair the tradesman must keep informed of new developments. Another mechanic works on a metal lathe as the commentator says that sometimes parts must be made in the shop. Still another mechanic welds a broken fender. An automotive electrician tests a coil. Other adjustments that the automotive serviceman is called upon to make are indicated by views of mechanics adjusting brakes, repairing an ignition switch, checking wheel alignment, and soldering a leaky radiator. Specialists in automotive service are indicated by views of an engine repair shop, fender and body shop, battery and electric shop, and brake and wheel alignment shop. The commentator says that in large garages there are opportunities for advancement for those who have technical knowledge, skill, and ability to meet the public. A salesman is shown talking to a prospective buyer as the commentator says that mechanics who become salesmen benefit from their knowledge of the operation of the motorcar.
The next sequence is on training for entrance and advancement in automotive service. Jobs open to beginners are suggested by views of a mechanic's helper and a worker in a parts department. The commentator emphasizes the importance of study for the man trying to advance in automotive service. Some training and study plans are suggested: service manuals, motion pictures, night school courses, trade schools, and correspondence courses.
The final sequence deals with opportunities for high school training for automotive service. A physics class studies the principles of the gas engine. In a mathematics class students work a problem in horsepower. The commentator emphasizes the importance of taking all the mathematics possible in high school. Views of classes in mechanical drawing and of automotive and machine shops are accompanied by brief commentary descriptions of the contributions of each to the training of the prospective automotive worker. Views of shop managers and mechanics at work and of an automobile assembly line are shown as the commentator says that with the steadily increasing output of motor vehicles there is considerable demand for automobile servicemen.


Ken Smith sez: "Physics is not only an interesting subject, but very necessary if you are to become a first-class auto mechanic." This film, one of the Your Life's Work series, is a relic from the days when people other than high school dropouts repaired cars.
Appraisal. Good for (1) indicating some types of work and opportunities in automotive service and (2) suggesting the training necessary for entrance into and advancement in the vocations shown. Should be useful in assisting vocational choice. Information is included on preparatory opportunities in high school. The pictures seem to be organized around the commentary.
Photography and sound are excellent.
Zero = first main title

00:00 Man and women in turn-of-the-century automobile
00:20 Bus on road
00:22 Car on country / rural dirt road
00:28 Cars on city highway, tall buildings in background
00:37 Garage serviceman (mechanic) working on piston
01:40 VS scenes of auto repair
03:00 Montage of gasoline station (service station, gas station) signs and facades
04:30 Teenage boy reading books in chair
05:00 Man with pointer lectures to small group
05:22 Movie being shown to business meeting
05:44 Students in vocational schools learning about auto repair
06:40 Animated graphic of piston firing
07:25 Gears -- model of gearbox
07:30 Pointer on chart showing electric circuitry of automobile
09:00 Teenagers work on cars



AUTOMOBILES JOBS CAREERS SHOPS early automobile, steering wheel on right side of car; driver with goggles; replacing cam shaft; valve grinding; welding; working in garages on cars; adjusting brakes; aligning wheels; signs "Auto repair" "Improved Lubrication"; speciality repair shops; young man studying; training; showing movies in the local shop; night classes in auto repair; automotive trade schools; correspondence course; high school classes: physics class, mechanical drawing class; math classes; animation: diagram of engine; excellent shot: cut away of engine transmission showing all the gears working together; man washing car grease from his body in a bucket; hoisting engine blocks

Zero = first main title

00:00 Man and women in turn-of-the-century automobile
00:20 Bus on road
00:22 Car on country / rural dirt road
00:28 Cars on city highway, tall buildings in background
00:37 Garage serviceman (mechanic) working on piston
01:40 VS scenes of auto repair
03:00 Montage of gasoline station (service station, gas station) signs and facades
04:30 Teenage boy reading books in chair
05:00 Man with pointer lectures to small group
05:22 Movie being shown to business meeting
05:44 Students in vocational schools learning about auto repair
06:40 Animated graphic of piston firing
07:25 Gears -- model of gearbox
07:30 Pointer on chart showing electric circuitry of automobile
09:00 Teenagers work on cars





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Reviews

Reviewer: Victor Von Psychotron - - September 15, 2014
Subject: A bit bland
It's an interesting look back at auto mechanics in the early 1940s, but the film itself isn't exciting.
Reviewer: ASEMastertech - - February 9, 2012
Subject: A slice of what it was like....
I am currently professional automotive tech, and I find this piece quite interesting. So much has changed in the field, yet the fundamentals are relatively the same. A GOOD mechanic/technician goes through that much training and so much more now. You need to keep your education current if you want to stay sharp, and understand how things change from year to year.
Reviewer: Christine Hennig - - October 24, 2003
Subject: It Makes This Thump, Thump, Thump Sound Whenever I Accelerate...
Part of the Your Life Work series, this vocational training film presents the exciting career field of auto mechanics and makes it seem dull and requiring lots of education. Good thing most mechanics got into the field through tinkering with cars or we wouldnt have anybody to fix our vehicles. A very ordinary film.
Ratings: Camp/Humor Value: **. Weirdness: *. Historical Interest: ***. Overall Rating: **.
Reviewer: Spuzz - - January 9, 2003
Subject: Take this as a warning
This occupational awareness film made for unsuspecting high school students, plows on the seemingly endless education one must go through in order to fix cars. C'mon, PHYSICS? Mathematics? Book-keeping? It's almost as if the film-makers were trying to say to the kids, "Stay In School, we don't want you uneducated runts!" reccomended!
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